Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Pictures


Chris Walton, known as The Dutchess, drinks coffee with fingernails stretching and curving from her hands like a tangle of spaghetti. Meet the 45-year-old grandmother with the world's longest fingernails. This Las Vegas singer and musician stopped cutting her fingernails 18 years ago and now her nails have reached a total of 20 feet. Her amazing dedication to her nails has been officially recognised by the 2012 edition of the Guinness Record Book.



A man has invented a typewriter that paints. The Chromatic Typewriter works by having each letter loaded with oil paint. Washington-based artist Tyree Callahan converted an old 1937 Underwood Standard model. 




A blue tit perches on branch in snow, at the Cairngorms National Park, Scotland




 Michael Kemeter balances at a dizzying altitude of more than 3,000 feet on a strip of material no more than one inch wide. The highline was set up between a fissure across a steep gully at the Yosemite National Park in California.




 A farmer has harvested a human-shaped red radish from his field in Xuzhou, eastern China's Jiangsu Province. Bao Jiagen said the radish even more closely resembled a human figure several days ago when it had a small head with radish leaves on. "The head was pulled off by onlookers at the market".




 A model presents a creation during the 2012 Korea Hair Collection in Seoul

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Young woman with cancer asks Hollywood actor out for coffee using online video

 

Attempting to re-enter the world of dating after being diagnosed with cancer, 26 year-old Lindsey Miller has posted a video of herself online in which she asks actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt out for coffee.

 


The heart warming video in which Miss Miller asks out Gordon-Levitt, who is set to star in the upcoming Batman film The Dark Knight Rises, has become an internet hit. In the footage the Los Angeles-based redhead says she has found it difficult to date since being diagnosed with cancer. However, she reveals that after seeing Gordon-Levitt star in 50/50, a film in which he plays a man struggling with cancer, she has decided that he is just the man to help her overcome her fears.

Looking straight down the lens, Miss Miller, who is suffering from pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer, invites the 30 year-old actor to join her for a casual drink. "After a year of living with this, I've decided to get back on the dating scene and I'd like my first date to be with you. Let's not be overdramatic, just a cup of coffee with you would make me happy." The video, which was posted on YouTube, has so far been watched by over 370,000 people.

 

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/8900453/Young-woman-with-cancer-asks-Batman-actor-out-for-coffee-using-online-video.html

Friday, November 25, 2011

Superman fan goes surgery-mad



Because of his love for Superman, Filipino designer Herbert Chavez changed his physical appearance to look like the Man of Steel. For more than a decade, 35-year-old Chavez has undergone a series of procedures that have made his nose higher and slimmed down his thighs. He has had surgery on his cheeks, lips and chin, and injections to whiten his skin."Superman is my idol. I want to look like him," Chavez said. "That's why I copied his nose and the proportion of Superman's face." Once a typical-looking Filipino, Chavez now has the face of Clark Kent.



His admiration began when he was a child and watched Superman save the world in movies. He later began collecting Superman items, including cups, bed sheets, action figures and life-size Superman statues. He has even designed his own Superman costumes. 


People in Calamba, south of Manila, refer to him as the "village superman". Children play with him when they see him in the streets. "It's ridiculous when you look at it, but it's a source of happiness for the children. They can forget the problems facing our world," said resident Filipe Rabanan. 

 
Chavez says doing good deeds is what makes a hero - a lesson worth teaching children."We should show them that even if you're just a regular father or mother, anybody can become a superhero," he said. "Doing good to someone, to your neighborhood or to your social life, that makes you a superhero." 



Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Miss USA 2006 Q&A



1. If you could tell your younger self something that you know now as an adult, what would it be? (Miss Ohio)

2. Do you think that today's pop superstars are positive role models for young people? Why or why not? (Miss Kentucky)

3. So many families seem to be growing apart. How can we keep them together? (Miss California)

4. What can men learn most from women? (Miss Georgia)

5. Are we as a society getting a little too concerned with being politically correct? (Miss Florida)

Getting Japanese Women Back on Track

Japan's economy is threatened. Not just by an ongoing recession and March's disastrous earthquake and tsunami, but by an aging population that is decimating the workforce. If ever a country needed a breakthrough idea for productivity, it's now. In fact, a solution exists: Japan's underutilized women. According to a 2010 study by Goldman Sachs, "If Japan could close its gender employment gap, Japan's workforce could expand by 8.2 million and the level of Japan's GDP could increase by as much as 15 percent." 

Yet according to a new study from the Center for Work-Life Policy, 74% of college-educated women in Japan voluntarily quit their jobs for six months or more — more than twice the number of their counterparts in the U.S. (31%) and Germany (35%). The reason for this enormous brain drain: a toxic combination of social mores and how they're manifested in Japan's corporate culture. 

Japanese tradition defines a woman's primary role as ryosaikenbo — "good wife, wise mother." It is assumed that most women will quit their jobs when they marry, a phenomenon known as a "happy resignation". Because of this, female college graduates are automatically sidetracked onto the "office lady" path, a dead-end support staff role whose duties include making tea for male managers, dusting their desks, and serving drinks at after-hours functions. Between men and women, there's a huge earnings gap: On average, women only earn 72% of the compensation paid to men for equivalent jobs.

Japan boasts a large pool of well-educated women, with women constituting nearly half of university graduates. Companies should make a special effort to recruit, retain, and accelerate female talent to give Japan's ailing economy the boost it so desperately needs. 




Vocabulary
decimating - destroying a great number of (workforce)
breakthrough - significant development or achievement
underutilized - not fully used
counterparts - people resembling another (American and German women are counterparts of Japanese women.)
brain drain - loss of trained professional personnel in the country's workforce
mores - customs or practices in the society 
sidetracked - being led out of the way
pool - source
ailing - troubled; sick

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-11-14/getting-japanese-women-back-on-track.html

Friday, November 4, 2011

Miss USA 2008 Question and Answer





1. Some cosmetic companies have marketed beauty products for girls to learn elementary school. Do you think this is a good thing? (Miss Pennsylvania, 4th runner-up)

2. In some countries, when you turn 18 you are required to spend a year in the military. Do you think this should be enforced in our country? Why or why not? (Miss Texas, Miss USA 2008)

3. If you could help one famous person to better themselves, who would you pick and how would you help them? (Miss Oklahoma, 3rd runner-up)

4. There are parents today who raise their children without letting them watch any television or look at the internet. What is your opinion on this? (Miss New Jersey, 2nd runner-up)

5. Has being a beautiful woman given you any special opportunities in life? And if so, how have you used it in a positive and constructive way? (Miss Mississippi, 1st runner-up)

Saturday, October 29, 2011

Miss USA 2011 Q&A




1, Many have argued that marijuana should be legalized and taxed to boost the economy and alleviate drug wars. Do you believe in the legalization of marijuana? Why or why not?

2. Recently, a controversial pastor in the United States burned the Koran. Should burning of any religious article be protected by the first amendment in the same way burning the flag is protected?

3. Recently the personal discretions of men in positions of power have exposed their families' private lives. What advice would you give a woman whose spouse put her in a position of public humiliation?

4. There have been recent deaths of students who have been bullied on the internet. If the victim commits suicide, should the bully be prosecuted? Why or why not?


Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGU0M7xTyvE

Thursday, October 27, 2011

Miss Universe 2002 Q&A


1. If you had to represent another country in this competition, what country would that be and why?

2. What is the biggest misconception of people about your country?

3. What's the one thing you need to overcome?

4. What is the most important thing that you learned about yourself through participating in Miss Universe?

5. If your life were videotaped, what would you erase and what would you replay?




Video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRksaJriCHA

Sunday, September 4, 2011

Managerial Job Interview Guide

OPENING:
1. Provide job description – What is the specific position? What is the job about?
The position available in our company is operations manager. The operations manager is in charge of overseeing, designing and redesigning business operations to provide Internet service to clients/customers. He is expected to handle ten subordinates (operations officers) in his department.”
2. Ask for application or resume (if not yet submitted)

3. Overview of unit and campus – Give short introduction about the office
“Should you be hired for this job, you will report to this office in Manila. As you can see, there are several departments – accounting, sales, etc. You will work together with these departments...”


Transition from Opening to Interview Proper:
Shall we start the interview?”
Let's move on with the interview.”


INTERVIEW PROPER: Specific Questions
1. General  
  • Tell me about your previous work experience. 
  • How is your experience relevant or helpful to this job?
  • Why are you interested in this position as operations manager?
  • How would the people around you describe you?
  • What’s a common misconception some people have about you?
  • Tell me about a difficult decision you had to make recently. Walk me through the problem and what your thought process was, and how you ultimately handled it.
  • What is one thing that you have had difficulty overcoming in your career, and how did you do that?
  • What is some of the most useful criticism you’ve ever received? Why?
  • Have you ever been given criticism that you disagreed with? What was it? How did you handle that?
2. Getting things done
  • What has been your biggest achievement at your previous company?
  • What were your department’s major goals last year? How did you settle on those goals? Was your department able to meet them? How did you measure whether or not you met those goals?
  • What’s an example of a goal you didn’t meet? How come? How did you respond to that?
  • What will success look like for you this year? Why is that important? How hard will it be to get there?
  • Tell me about one of the (previous) organization’s (or department's) largest or most important projects and how you managed it, from start to finish. I’m interested in something where others were doing the work, but you were overseeing it.
    - What was the goal or vision for it?
    - What happened?
    - How did you ensure that happened?
    - How do you know it happened?
    - What lessons did you get from that project?
  • What are some of the biggest obstacles your organization/department experienced in the last few years? What did you do to address them?
  • Tell me about something you got done at  your previous company that someone else in your role probably wouldn’t have.
3. Managing People

  • How would you describe yourself as a manager? How do you think others would describe you?
  • What are your strengths and weaknesses as a manager?
  • What is your philosophy about management?
  • What do you think the fundamental purpose of a manger is? 
  • How has your management philosophy evolved as you’ve gained more management experience?
  • What do you do to work on being a better manager?
  • What do you think are some of the most common ways people fail at management?
  • Tell me about an employee who became more successful as a result of your management.
  • Who are your best people? What are you doing to retain them?
  • What do you look for when you hire people?
  • When was the last time you fired someone or coached someone out? How many people have you fired in the last two years? Why? (You’re looking for a manager who fires people who don’t perform at a high standard.)
  • Tell me about the most difficult employee situation you ever had to handle. What did you do and what was the result?
  • Tell me about a time you were managing a poor performer. How did you handle it and what was the outcome?
  • What was the most difficult management decision you’ve ever had to make?
  • Tell me about a management mistake that you made in the past. What would you do differently?
  • Even the best bosses generate complaints from their employees now and then. What complaints do you think the people you’ve managed would have about you?

CLOSING:
1. Questions or additional comments from the candidate
"Do you have any questions about the job?"
2. Timeline to conclude interviews and make a hiring decision
"The company will contact you within a week to inform the results of your application."
3. Explain who they may be meeting with next 
"Should you get the job, please come back to the office and report to the HR (Human Resource) Department for further instruction and orientation."
4. Thank the applicant
"Thank you for your interest in this job and for taking time for this interview. We will keep in touch. Have a good day!"  (shake hands)

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Desperate, Sick Indonesians Use Railroad Therapy

Villagers lie on a railway track for an electricity therapy in Rawa Buaya, Jakarta, Indonesia. 


Ignoring the red-and-white danger sign, Sri Mulyati walks slowly to the train tracks, lies down and stretches her body across the rails. Like the nearly dozen others lined up along the track, the 50-year-old diabetes patient has given up on doctors and can't afford the expensive medicines they prescribe. In her mind, she has only one option left: electric therapy. "I'll keep doing this until I'm completely cured," said Mulyati, while an oncoming passenger train sends a current racing through her body. She leaps from the tracks as the train approaches and then, after it has passed, climbs back into position. 


Pseudo-medical treatments are wildly popular in many parts of Asia. There are stories about people who are cured after touching a magic stone or eating dung from sacred cows. These miracles attract thousands, especially in Indonesia, where the health care system is not available to the poor.

Medical experts say there is no evidence that lying on the rails does any good. But Mulyati insists it provides more relief for her symptoms - high-blood pressure, sleeplessness and high cholesterol - than any doctor has since she was first diagnosed with diabetes 13 years ago. She turned to train track therapy last year after hearing a rumor about an ethnic Chinese man, who was partially paralyzed by a stroke, going to the tracks to kill himself, but instead finding himself cured. It's a story that's been told and retold in Indonesia.

Monday, August 29, 2011

Japan's bored audiences turn off TVs

The Japanese, once one of the most TV-addicted people on the planet, are watching less television these days. Daily TV viewing time, which averaged more than five hours in the 1970s, decreased to 3 hours and 28 minutes by 2010, according to the NHK Broadcasting Culture Research Institute. Males aged 10 to 20 are watching less than two hours a day. Meanwhile, program ratings have been going down for most networks, including NHK, TV Asahi, NTV, TBS, Fuji TV and TV Tokyo, despite spikes for major sport events and other special programming.


There are various causes for this decrease in TV viewing. Like other countries, Japanese families no longer sit around the TV watching the same show, as viewers did in the 1960 to 1990s. The Japanese now use other devices for entertainment, including PCs, smartphones and game consoles. But the biggest cause, says Hiro Otaka, a media analyst for the Bunka Tsushin entertainment news services, is that the programs have become boring. "They don't put as much money or creativity into the shows as they used to, so program content has declined," he says. "You have so many of these cheaply made variety shows with comedians, it's hard to tell them apart. Viewers have just become tired of the same thing again and again."

Saturday, August 27, 2011

Yakuza Awareness Classes

This August, Police in Fukuoka have started conducting organized crime education and awareness classes at middle and high schools in the prefecture. Prefectural police report that the current cultural tolerance of the yakuza often results in admiration of them by misinformed youth; indeed, many yakuza first participated in gang activities in their formative early teens. The police have therefore created this program to educate middle and high school students about the realities of yakuza life.

The curriculum includes ways of dealing with yakuza confrontations (for example, what to do when approached in the workplace by a yakuza demanding to be payed off), a run-down of how the yakuza make money (through drug smuggling, loan sharking and other illegal activities) and general advice on how not to get entangled in a gang.

Of the 69,000 students who had taken the class before June of this year, 24,000 were asked to participate in a survey. According to the results, 40% had some yakuza presence in their lives. 2% had reported they were even invited to join a gang. 97% of students reported that the classes were easy to understand, and that “they now understood the truth about the yakuza.”

In the space allocated for comments, some reported that there were shootings near their house, and that they were afraid of being hit by a stray bullet.

Seven teachers have a special license to teach the class. They plan to visit 545 public and private schools at least once by March of next year.

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Cat cafes purrfect for lonely and childless people

TOKYO —On the third floor of a rather plain looking building in Ikebukuro, there is a small but busy cafe called Nekorobi. Customers do not come here for the food but for the staff, a sophisticated crew of 12 that are as varied as they are beautiful. 

After disinfecting their hands and putting on a specially provided pair of slippers, customers can talk to and play with Sugar, Aisha, Anko and the others for as long as they like, if they are willing to pay.


Nekorobi is one of Tokyo’s ever-growing numbers of cat cafes. Faced with a high cost of living, long working hours and the realities of life in cramped apartments, many Japanese people are unable to keep pets of their own.Cat cafes have increased in number for the Japanese population that is increasingly single and childless, and where loneliness is also a rising problem.

The world’s first cat cafe opened in Taiwan in 1998, but after it became popular with Japanese tourists, Japan’s first cat cafe, Neko no Jikan (or “Cat Time”), opened in Osaka in 2004. There are now at least 39 cat cafes in Tokyo alone, and some are so popular that reservations are required. Because of this popularity, the cats have also become mini-celebrities, starring in magazines and coffee table books.

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Anti-Korean Wave in Japan turns political

Despite Bae Yong-joon’s continued demigod status in Japan and K-Pop’s domination on the Oricon charts these days, it seems that some Japanese have had enough of weepy Korean soap operas and Korean idols. 
 
Although the exact numbers vary according to media outlets, Chosun Ilbo reported that 500 demonstrators gathered outside Fuji TV headquarters on Aug 7, ostensibly to protest the broadcaster’s perpetuation of the Korean Wave. 

GIRLS GENERATION appear at MTV Video Music Aid Japan

Popular Japanese actor Sousuke Takaoka, 29, of “Battle Royale” fame first sparked controversy when he tweeted anti-Hallyu sentiments last month. “I’ll never watch Channel 8 (Fuji TV) again,” he said. “I often think it’s Korean TV. Japanese people want traditional Japanese programs.” 

When Takaoka was reportedly dropped from his agency following his Tweets, critics of Korean pop culture and right-wing nationalists organized the rally via the Internet. 

Twitter spread word of the anti-Hallyu charge, which took on a political slant as some protesters whipped out Japanese flags and chanted “Long live the emperor” while others belted out the Japanese national anthem.

Men's life expectancy rises, but women's falls


The average life expectancy of Japanese women slipped 0.05 year in 2010 to 86.39 years, the first decline in five years, but remained the highest in the world, the welfare ministry said Wednesday.


"Last summer's intense heat wave probably took a toll on many physically fragile seniors," an official at the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry said.
 
Heat stroke-related deaths reached an all-time high of 1,718, with those aged 65 and above accounting for 80 percent of the total. Deaths among the elderly from heart disease and pneumonia also increased — especially last summer — compared with a year earlier, decreasing women's life expectancy, according to the ministry.

Japanese men's life expectancy, however, hit a new high for the fifth straight year at 79.64 years, although the annual increase was just 0.05 year, down from 0.3 in 2009, the ministry said.


Worldwide, the longevity of Japanese women remained the highest for the 26th year running. Women in Hong Kong ranked second with a life expectancy of 85.9 years, followed by French women at 84.8 years.

Japanese men, meanwhile, moved up the global rankings from fifth in 2009 to fourth last year. Men in Hong Kong came top with a life expectancy of 80.0 years, while Swiss men placed second at 79.8 years and Israeli men were third at 79.7 years.

Monday, August 22, 2011

Wedding rings a hot item in disaster zone

Sendai — Sales of engagement and wedding rings have risen sharply at major department stores in Sendai since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

Fujisaki, a Sendai department store founded in 1819, said an increasing number of customers have bought rings since the store fully reopened on April 22, with May-July sales rising roughly 30 percent from a year earlier.


"I think the disaster prompted people to rethink the bond they have with their partners and to reflect on family," said Yuka Aihara of Sendai Mitsukoshi, which saw April-July wedding and engagement ring sales double from a year earlier after full store operations resumed in April.

Sendai Mitsukoshi's customers are mainly elderly women, but "since the disaster, we now have more couples in their 20s or 30s," said Akira Sato, who runs the store's jewelry section.


At Fujisaki, a young woman who was looking for a wedding ring for her partner said the catastrophe motivated them to get married.

When the quake struck, the woman, who is from the Kanto region, was visiting her boyfriend in Rikuzentakta, Iwate Prefecture, one of the worst-hit areas. It took them four days to be reunited at a shelter, prompting them to tie the knot, she said.

Photos of the Day: 8-22-11


A boulder topped with a pink ribbon and covered in a spray-painted message: "Happy birthday, Isa" sits in the driveway of Isabelle Prevost in Acton Vale, Quebec. The 20-ton stone was left there as a gift by Dany Lariviere, Prevost's ex-husband and mayor of a nearby municipality, following lengthy divorce proceedings. Lariviere joked that his wife had always wanted a big rock (diamond) — and he quipped that this one is, in his words, between 18 and 24 "carat-tons".

Susanne Eman, 32, and her two sons, Brendin and Gabriel, do their weekly shopping trip at the local supermarket in Casa Grande, Arizona. She is trying to become the fattest woman ever. Already 50 stone (318 kg), she aims to reach a whopping 115 stone (732 kg) by guzzling more and more food every day.

The driver of this car tried to find her way out of a traffic jam - only to drive into a lane of freshly laid cement. The driver, believed to be a lawyer, was attempting to perform a U-turn when she made the embarrassing mishap in front of bemused construction workers. She then had to sit in the car while dozens of passing people took pictures of the Lexus GS in Houston, Texas.

Tribesmen work at the Mae Salong Flower Hills Resort in the Mae Salongnok District, Chiang Rai Province, in Thailand

Holidaymakers, most with swimming rings, crowd in a salty swimming pool, locally known as "China's Dead Sea'', as they wait for man-made waves coming to them during a hot summer day in Daying county in southwest China's Sichuan province.

Saturday, August 20, 2011

Japanese migrants caught between cultures

THE huge Japanese earthquake and the contrasting fortunes of the Japanese and Brazilian economies have sent many Brazilian-Japanese back to Brazil. 
 
But Japanese with roots in Latin America are finding that despite the economic boom in Brazil, wealth and jobs are yet to trickle down to the poor.

And the unpleasant existence they endured in Japan - discriminated against and ostracised - is often no better in Brazil.

Academic and documentary-maker Kimihiro Tsumura has made a film on these people, trapped between two radically different societies.

As Japan's economy sinks while Latin America's rises, such people are questioning where their future lies. The Japanese government has offered to pay for their tickets out of the country - provided they don't return.
For Professor Tsumura, this policy is unfair. "Morally, it's against human rights," he said. "For the families who choose to take the grant, they can't come back to Japan for three years, if at all. It's just so opportunistic."

The degasegi, as they are known, are usually employed on three-month contracts and are the first fired when there's a downturn. The children are allowed - and in the case of some families, expected - to work in factories from the age of 15.

Several hundred thousand people in Japan have roots in Latin America. They come from a 2.5 million-strong Japanese diaspora based mainly in Brazil. Their life can be a dispiriting process of bouncing between two worlds as the economic circumstances and immigration laws change.

Monday, August 15, 2011

Places to Visit in Japan

Since the March 11 disaster, Japan has struggled to attract visitors back to its shores. Earlier this year, the world watched in horror as the country was hit by a 9.0-magnitude earthquake, followed by a devastating tsunami and a nuclear crisis, all in quick succession. The disaster left almost 25,000 people dead or missing, while the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant plunged Japan into its worst crisis since World War II.

As horrifying as the images of these natural disasters were, what caught the attention of many people around the world was the resilience of the Japanese people, who showed courage and solidarity throughout. It is this same spirit of perseverance that has led Japan to launch a campaign to invite visitors back to the country, just five months after the disaster. The Asia Inbound Sightseeing Organization recently invited 25 journalists from eight countries to spend a week in Japan, to help spread the word that the country is back on its feet and ready to welcome guests.

Chiba Prefecture

Located in the greater Tokyo area, Chiba Prefecture has many natural and cultural attractions.

Shinshoji Temple in Narita is the main Buddhist temple in the area, and was built in the eighth century. The temple known is for its fire-burning ceremony, in which people pray for their wishes to come true, led by the temple’s highest priest. Monks are often spotted filing in and out of the temple.

Yamanashi Prefecture

Located in the mountains of Yamanashi Prefecture, Kofu is the heart of Japan’s wine country.

Mercian winery, one of the biggest wine companies in the country, which produces fine reds and whites under the Chateau Mercian label, is open to visitors all year round.

Mount Fuji

Mount Fuji is the highest mountain in Japan, at around 3,776 meters. It’s located around 100 kilometers southwest of Tokyo, on the border of Shizuoka and Yamanashi prefectures.

Izu City, Shizuoka Prefecture

For golf enthusiasts, Yugashima Club Hotel and Resort in Izu city is definitely worth a visit. The hotel and club are set in a secluded area of Izu, and the 18-hole course not only provides a challenge for golfers, but also some glorious views of Mount Fuji.

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Trade in Human Hair Booming

The global trade in human hair is soaring and becoming a major industry, according to e-commerce website alibaba.com. Celebrities are increasing the popularity of using real hair to supplement their own. In recent months singer Beyonce, footballer Wayne Rooney and actor Sarah Jessica Parker have all been seen sporting new and more voluminous locks.

Sarah Jessica Parker
Alibaba spokeswoman Linda Kozlowski said: “There's been a huge upswing in hair. The celebrity culture has made hair extensions more popular, and everyone wants hair from India.” Hair stylist Lucinda Ellery explains why: “There is a big religious reason in India for people to get rid of their hair. They get it cut off and give it to monks. Now it's…an economic resource for the country," she said.

Variety of Hair Extensions for Sale
 The alibaba.com website reports a 160 per cent increase in searches for “human hair” in the past year. The USA, China and Britain are the three largest international buyers. Ms Ellery said the rise of social media websites is one reason behind the success of the industry, saying: "It's really driven by things like Facebook and Twitter, tabloids and magazines. Women want to be more and more glamorous, as a result of this big celebrity culture."

Paris Hilton
She added that the cost of human hair is also rising with its demand: "In the last 10 years, it's tripled, doubled and tripled again." Alibaba says blonde is the most popular color because it can be easily dyed to match the customer’s own natural color. It says wavy is the biggest-selling texture, recently overtaking straight hair.

Air-Conditioned Clothes a Hit in Japan


Could air-conditioned clothes be the next big thing? Japanese inventor Hirosho Ichigaya seems to think so. The former Sony engineer has created a company called Kuchofuku (“air-conditioned clothing” in Japanese) to help beat the heat of the Japanese summer. There is a shortage of power in Japan following the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis in March. Many offices and schools must not turn their air-conditioning below 27 degrees. Around 1,000 companies in Japan, including Toyota, have bought Kuchofuku for their staff.


Mr Ichigaya started Kuchofuku in 2004 after working on finding more energy-efficient alternatives to air conditioners. He wanted to find a way to reduce global warming. His company is now struggling to meet the orders for his clothes, which have become the must-have item of the summer. All of the clothes have small fans inside them. These make a non-stop breeze and evaporate sweat. Ichigaya said: "People ask me why I would want to wear a jacket when it's so hot. I tell them because it's cooler than being naked.”

Answers: TOEIC # 501

1. A
2. B
3. C
4. C
5. C
6. A
7. A
8. D

TOEIC Part 5 (Test Sheet # 501)

Directions: A word or phrase is missing in each of the sentences below. Four answer choices are given below each sentence. Select the best answer to complete the sentence. Then mark the letter (A), (B), (C), or (D) on your answer sheet.

1. Register early if you would like to attend next Tuesday’s ------- on project management.
(A) seminar
(B) reason
(C) policy
(D) scene

2. Paul Brown resigned last Monday from his position as ------- executive of the
company.
(A) fine
(B) chief
(C) front
(D) large

3. The financial audit of Soft Peach Software ------- completed on Wednesday by a certified accounting firm.
(A) to be
(B) having been
(C) was
(D) were

4. The organizers of the trip reminded participants to ------- at the steps of the city hall at 2:00 P.M.
(A) see
(B) combine
(C) meet
(D) go

5. ------- is no better season than winter to begin training at Silver’s Fitness Center.
(A) When
(B) It
(C) There
(D) As it

6. The recent worldwide increase in oil prices has led to a ------- demand for electric vehicles.
(A) greater
(B) greatest
(C) greatly
(D) greatness

7. Maria Vásquez has a wide range of experience, ------- worked in technical, production, and marketing positions.
(A) having
(B) has
(C) having had
(D) had

8. Tickets will not be redeemable for cash or credit at any time, ------- will they be replaced if lost or stolen.
(A) but
(B) though
(C) only
(D) nor

Monday, August 8, 2011

Photos of the Day: 7-8-11

Photo No. 1
Photo No. 2
Photo No. 3
Photo No. 4
Photo No. 5
Photo No. 6
Photo No. 7

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Song: Green Grass Grows All Around

Part 1: HOLE
There was a hole
In the middle of the ground
The prettiest hole
That you ever did see
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around


Part 2: TREE
And in this hole
There was a tree
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
Well the tree in the hole
And the hole in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

Part 3: BRANCH
And on this tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
Well, the branch on the tree
And the tree in the hole
And the hole in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

Part 4: NEST
And on this branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
Well, the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the hole
And the hole in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

Part 5: EGG
And in this nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
Well, the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the hole
And the hole in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

Part 6: BIRD
And in this egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
Well, the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the hole
And the hole in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

ENDING
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

 =====================================================

Part 1: HOLE
TEACHER: There was a hole
STUDENT: There was a hole
TEACHER: In the middle of the ground
STUDENT: In the middle of the ground
TEACHER: The prettiest hole
STUDENT: The prettiest hole
TEACHER: That you ever did see
STUDENT: That you ever did see
TOGETHER:
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around


Part 2: TREE
TEACHER: And in this hole
STUDENT: And in this hole
TEACHER: There was a tree
STUDENT: There was a tree
TEACHER: The prettiest tree
STUDENT: The prettiest tree
TEACHER: That you ever did see
STUDENT: That you ever did see
TOGETHER:
Well the tree in the hole
And the hole in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

Part 3: BRANCH
TEACHER: And on this tree
STUDENT: And on this tree
TEACHER: There was a branch
STUDENT: There was a branch
TEACHER: The prettiest branch
STUDENT: The prettiest branch
TEACHER: That you ever did see
STUDENT: That you ever did see
TOGETHER:
Well, the branch on the tree
And the tree in the hole
And the hole in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

Part 4: NEST
TEACHER: And on this branch
STUDENT: And on this branch
TEACHER: There was a nest
STUDENT: There was a nest
TEACHER: The prettiest nest
STUDENT: The prettiest nest
TEACHER: That you ever did see
STUDENT: That you ever did see
TOGETHER:
Well, the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the hole
And the hole in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

Part 5: EGG
TEACHER: And in this nest
STUDENT: And in this nest
TEACHER: There was an egg
STUDENT: There was an egg
TEACHER: The prettiest egg
STUDENT: The prettiest egg
TEACHER: That you ever did see
STUDENT: That you ever did see
TOGETHER:
Well, the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the hole
And the hole in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

Part 6: BIRD
TEACHER: And in this egg
STUDENT: And in this egg
TEACHER: There was a bird
STUDENT: There was a bird
TEACHER: The prettiest bird
STUDENT: The prettiest bird
TEACHER: That you ever did see
STUDENT: That you ever did see
TOGETHER:
Well, the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the hole
And the hole in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

ENDING
TOGETHER:
And the green grass grows all around, all around
And the green grass grows all around, all around

Song: " Down in Grandpa's Farm"

I.

We're on our way, we're on our way,
On our way to Grandpa's farm.
We're on our way, we're on our way,
On our way to Grandpa's farm.

Down in Grandpa's farm there is a black and white cow.
Down in Grandpa's farm there is a black and white cow.
The cow, she makes a sound like this: MOO MOO
The cow, she makes a sound like this: MOO MOO

II. 

We're on our way, we're on our way,
On our way to Grandpa's farm.
We're on our way, we're on our way,
On our way to Grandpa's farm.

Down in Grandpa's farm there is a little yellow duck.
Down in Grandpa's farm there is a little yellow duck.
The duck, he makes a sound like this: QUACK QUACK
The duck, he makes a sound like this: QUACK QUACK

III.
We're on our way, we're on our way,
On our way to Grandpa's farm.
We're on our way, we're on our way,
On our way to Grandpa's farm.

Down in Grandpa's farm there is a great big pig. 
Down in Grandpa's farm there is a great big pig.  
The pig, she makes a sound like this: OINK OINK
The pig, she makes a sound like this: OINK OINK

We're on our way, we're on our way,
On our way to Grandpa's farm.
We're on our way, we're on our way,
On our way to Grandpa's farm.

Song: "If All The Raindrops"


If all the raindrops were lemon drops and gum drops,
Oh, what a rain that would be!
Standing outside with my mouth open wide,
Eh eh eh eh, eh eh eh, eh eh eh!
If all the raindrops were lemon drops and gum drops,
Oh, what a rain that would be!

If all the snowflakes were candy bars and milk shakes,
Oh, what a snow that would be!
Standing outside with my mouth open wide,
Eh eh eh eh, eh eh eh, eh eh eh!
If all the snowflakes were candy bars and milk shakes,
Oh, what a snow that would be!

If all the sunbeams were bubble gum and ice cream,
Oh what a sun that would be!
Standing outside with my mouth open wide,
Eh eh eh eh, eh eh eh, eh eh eh!
If all the sunbeams were bubble gum and ice cream,
Oh what a sun that would be!

Saturday, July 30, 2011

Business English

JON: Hello, I'm Jon Brown.
ARIYA: Hello Jon. I'm Ariya from Planet Industries. I'm here to take you to our office.
JON: Thank you. That's very kind. Is it far to your office?
ARIYA: No, not far. It takes about 30 minutes if the traffic is OK. But we have some bad traffic jams sometimes.
JON: Yes, I've heard that.
ARIYA: So how was your flight, Jon?
JON: Not too bad. I managed to sleep for a few hours.
ARIYA: Is this your first trip to Thailand?
JON: No, it isn't. I came here two years ago on holiday with my wife.
ARIYA: Oh. Do you like Thailand?
JON: Yes. Very much.
ARIYA: Why do you like it?
JON: Oh, the people are very nice, the weather's great, and I love the beach.
ARIYA: That's really good to hear. 
JON: What do you do in Planet Industries?
ARIYA: I'm a marketing assistant.
JON: I see. How long have you worked there?
ARIYA: For about five years. Anyway, come with me. We'll drive to the office. My car is outside.

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Child Brides

The practice of child marriage is far more common throughout the world than many might suspect. According to UNICEF, as many as 50 million girls in developing countries were married before they turned 18 and 100 million more are expected to marry in the next decade. Child brides can be as young as 5 or 6 when they enter marriages, often with much older men.

"Whenever I saw him, I hid. I hated to see him," Tahani (in pink) recalls of the early days of her marriage to Majed, when she was 6 and he was 25. The young wife posed for this portrait with former classmate Ghada, also a child bride, outside their mountain home in Hajjah.
This group of young brides in a village in western Yemen were quiet and shy—until talk turned to education. Most of the girls, who were married between the ages of 14 and 16, had never attended school, but all say they still hope for an education.
Asia, a 14-year-old mother, washes her new baby girl at home in Hajjah while her 2-year-old daughter plays. Asia is still bleeding and ill from childbirth yet has no education or access to information on how to care for herself.
Long after midnight, five-year-old Rajani is roused from sleep and carried by her uncle to her wedding. Child marriage is illegal in India, so ceremonies are often held in the wee hours of morning. It becomes a secret the whole village keeps, explained one farmer.
Although early marriage is the norm in her small Nepali village, 16-year-old Surita wails in protest as she leaves her family's home, shielded by a traditional wedding umbrella and carried in a cart to her new husband's village.
Nujood Ali was ten when she fled her abusive, much older husband and took a taxi to the courthouse in Sanaa, Yemen. The girl's courageous act—and the landmark legal battle that ensued—turned her into an international heroine for women's rights. Now divorced, she is back home with her family and attending school again.


SOURCE: ngm.nationalgeographic.com

Businesses use more automation, fewer workers


As more Americans are getting unemployed, one thing is clear: A lot of companies are doing just fine, with fewer workers. They're going automated. 

Ron Baysden owns a Georgia plant that is the picture of high-tech manufacturing. Robots do much of the welding, lasers cut through sheets of steel, and computers track productivity.What you don't see is a lot of workers.

 
Baysden's family-run Impulse Manufacturing makes customized steel parts for everything from tractors to industrial refrigeration systems. When the recession hit, orders dried up and the company laid off nearly half of its 170 workers. Now, business is booming. The workforce is back up to 177 and profits are up too by 60 percent. Baysden plans to spend $1.5 million of that profit on new technology and none on new jobs. 

The technology is proving its worth for Baysden. For example, a laser can churn out one part in 30 seconds -- work that used to take 18 men and 30 minutes to complete. "A lot of my competitors did not survive 2009," Baysden said. "We survived because we spent a lot of money and investments in technology."

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, over the past two years, company spending on employees has only grown by four percent -- a sharp contrast to the 25 percent increase being spent on new technology. The biggest question is, "What happens to all those people who don't have jobs now?"



SOURCE: www.cbsnews.com